Incident at CALGARY INTL AB (CYYC)

Summary

2003-02-14: TSB reported that the incident was precipitated by a temporary failure of the artificial horizon system. The problem resolved itself and company maintenance has been unable to duplicate, or determine the cause.
2003-02-11: ALZ711 departed Calgary at 12:48Z on an IFR flight to Wetaskiwin at 0800. Approximately 30 miles north of Calgary, the pilot reported an unspecified problem, obtained the Edmonton weather, changed the destination to Edmonton International and asked the Controller to keep an eye on him. The Departure Controller provided the information to the Enroute Controller and transferred communication. Approximately 35 miles north of Calgary, the pilot reported 'a situation' and asked for vectors to Edmonton. Informed that Calgary was closer, the pilot requested vectors back to Calgary. At 1309Z while reversing course, the aircraft appeared to depart controlled flight, executing a course reversal and losing 2,500 feet in altitude in two radar sweeps, 10 seconds. In the subsequent 15 seconds, an additional 1,200 feet was lost, resulting in a minimum displayed altitude of 4,400 feet. Ground elevation in that vicinity is approximately 3,300 feet. The aircraft climbed back to altitude and received vectors back to Calgary, landing safely on Runway 25 at 1334Z. TSB will update.
2003-02-17: TSB reported that the Cessna 402C, C-FAFF, operating as ALZ 711 departed Calgary at 06:48 MST on an IFR flight to Wetaskiwin, AB and levelled off at 8,000 feet ASL. Approximately 30 miles north of Calgary, the pilot reported an unspecified problem to ATC, and after obtaining the Edmonton weather, changed the destination to Edmonton International. The Departure Controller provided the information and transferred communications to the Red Deer/Rocky Enroute Controller. Approximately 35 miles north of Calgary, the pilot reported further difficulties and requested vectors to Edmonton. On being informed that Calgary was closer, the pilot requested vectors back to Calgary. At 07:09, while reversing course, the aircraft appeared to depart controlled flight, losing 2,500 feet of altitude in two radar sweeps (10 seconds). In the subsequent 15 seconds, an additional 1,200 feet was lost, resulting in a minimum radar displayed altitude of 4,400, or 1,100 feet agl. The aircraft climbed back to altitude and received vectors back to Calgary, landing safely on Runway 25 at 07:34. It was dark at the time of the occurrence and it was reported that the aircraft was flying in cloud when the artificial horizon had temporarily failed. The autopilot, which received its information from that instrument, was disconnected shortly after the failure. Maintenance was unable to resolve or duplicate the problem, and the aircraft underwent inspection to determine any effects due to aerodynamic loading as a result of the accident.

Details


CADORS Number 2003C0185
Occurrence Type Incident
Reported By NAV CANADA
Occurred At 2003-02-11 - 13:09
Day or Night? Day-time
Fatalities 0
Injuries 0
Aerodrome ID CYYC
Aerodrome Name CALGARY INTL AB (CYYC)
Geographic Location Alberta, Canada, North America, Prairie and Northern Region, 40 NM N of Calgary
TSB Occurrence Number A03W0025
TSB Class of Investigation Class 5
AOR Number 27514
Reported By NAV CANADA
Categories System/component failure or malfunction [non-powerplant],Other,Loss of control - inflight
Events



Aircraft Details (1 aircraft)

Type Aeroplane
 Silhouette image of Aeroplane
Canadian Registration FAFF | Flightaware (Registration) | Flightaware (Tracking) | AvHerald
Foreign Registration
Country of Registration Canada
Occurrence Type Incident
Owner ALTA FLIGHTS (CHARTERS) INC.
Operator ALTA FLIGHTS (CHARTERS) INC. (5160) Commercial
Make  Silhouette image of CESSNA
CESSNA
Model 402C
Year Built 1979
Engine Type Reciprocating
Engine Make TELEDYNE CONTINENTAL
Engine Model TSIO-520-VB
Gear Type Land
Private No
Amateur Built No
Flight Number ALZ 711
Flight Rule
CARS Subpart
Phase of Flight Cruise
Damage No Damage
Fatalities 0
Injuries 0
Events Declared emergency/priority,Diversion,Flight instrument failure,Loss of control - inflight

Leave a Comment